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Vaccines for kids. What's needed and when.

Reviewed 10/22/2020

What vaccines does your child need?

Use this interactive guide to figure out which shots your child needs next.

Children need vaccines to help prevent a whole range of diseases. And parents may need a little help figuring out which vaccines are needed when.

Here's a schedule of routine childhood vaccines from birth through 18 years old. Special circumstances—such as health conditions, international travel or a missed dose—may affect vaccine recommendations. Your doctor is your best resource for any questions you have. You can also learn more about vaccine recommendations at cdc.gov/vaccines/parents.

BIRTH TO 6 MONTHS

  • Hepatitis B: First dose at birth. Second dose at 1–2 months old. Third dose at 6–18 months.
  • Influenza: Annual vaccination (two doses) begins at 6 months.
  • Rotavirus: Can be given as a two-dose series at 2 and 4 months or a three-dose series at 2, 4 and 6 months.
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis: First dose at 2 months, second dose at 4 months, third dose at 6 months.
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b: Available as a three- or four-dose series. First dose at 2 months, second dose at 4 months. Third dose (for a four-dose series) at 6 months.
  • Pneumococcal conjugate: First dose at 2 months, second dose at 4 months, third dose at 6 months.
  • Inactivated poliovirus: First dose at 2 months, second dose at 4 months, third dose at 6–15 months.

7 TO 18 MONTHS

  • Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis: Fourth dose at 15–18 months.
  • Hepatitis B: Third dose at 6–18 months. (See previous section.)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b: Final dose at 12–15 months.
  • Pneumococcal conjugate: Fourth dose at 12–15 months.
  • Inactivated poliovirus: Third dose at 6–18 months. (See previous section.)
  • Influenza: Annual vaccination of one or two doses.
  • Measles, mumps, rubella: First dose at 12–15 months.
  • Varicella: First dose at 12–15 months.
  • Hepatitis A: First dose at 12 months, second dose at least 6 months later.

19 MONTHS TO 6 YEARS

  • Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis: Fifth dose at 4–6 years.
  • Inactivated poliovirus: Fourth dose at 4–6 years.
  • Influenza: Annual vaccination of one or two doses.
  • Measles, mumps, rubella: Second dose at 4–6 years.
  • Varicella: Second dose at 4–6 years.
  • Hepatitis A: Second dose at least 6 months after first dose. (See previous section.)

7 TO 10 YEARS

  • Influenza: Annual vaccination of one or two doses until age 8. Thereafter, annual vaccination of one dose.
  • Human papillomavirus: Can start at age 9. Two- or three-dose series, depending on age at first vaccination.

11 TO 12 YEARS

  • Influenza: Annual vaccination.
  • Tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis: One dose.
  • Human papillomavirus: Two- or three-dose series, can start at age 9. (See previous section.)
  • Meningococcal: First dose of two-dose series.

13 TO 15 YEARS

  • Influenza: Annual vaccination.

16 TO 18 YEARS

  • Influenza: Annual vaccination.
  • Meningococcal: Second dose at 16 years.
  • Meningococcal B: Two-dose series. Talk to your doctor about the ideal timing of this vaccine series for your child.

ARE YOU CURRENT ON YOUR SHOTS?

Children aren't the only people who need vaccines. Adults do too. What vaccines do you need?

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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